Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Florida Allows Criminals to Work with Children and Elderly

 

 

Sun Sentinel

Trust Betrayed

A Sun Sentinel Investigation

People with criminal histories are allowed to work with Florida's most vulnerable residents.

By Peter Franceschina, Sally Kestin and John Maines

September 29, 2009


More than 8,700 people initially barred from being caregivers due to criminal records have been granted special permission by the state to work with children, the elderly and the infirm, a Sun Sentinel investigation found...

Felons have been allowed to work in day care centers, assisted living facilities and nursing homes through an exemption system created by Florida legislators in 1985...

 

Richard R. Day, a Georgia psychologist, was seeing a patient in 1994 when he unbuttoned her blouse and put his mouth on her breast, according to court records. She went to the police. During her next visit, Day removed his pants and underwear, and police arrested him.

Day pleaded guilty to sexual assault and public indecency and was put on four years of probation. As a result, Georgia officials placed restrictions on Day's psychology license, but he violated them and lost his license in 1997 for "devious, deceitful acts." He was also convicted that year of stalking his ex-wife.

After moving to Florida, Day received a mental health counselor's license from the state Department of Health, saying in his application that he had never been convicted of a crime or had a professional license revoked.

The Sun Sentinel obtained police and court records from Georgia ... "I was scared and nervous, upset," the woman told police. "I thought he was going to rape me, I mean, really."

The detective who arrested Day, Donnie Canada, said in an interview he wouldn't trust Day to counsel women.

"I wouldn't want him anywhere around not just my daughter or relatives, but any female in a professional capacity," he said. "To me it's appalling they would not follow up and call the [prosecutor] or the investigator to find out what happened. That's a failure of the system."

Monday, September 28, 2009

New Video: G Edward Griffin: Psychiatry & Politics

Psychiatry & Politics featuring G. Edward Griffin, author of The Creature from Jekyll Island, a critically acclaimed book about the U.S. Federal Reserve — on Congressman Ron Paul's "Reading List for a Free and Prosperous America".

PBS News just reported on how Chinese dissidents, whistleblowers and government petitioners are being labeled "mentally ill," incarcerated in psychiatric wards and subjected to electroshock — a tactic reminiscent of Soviet Russia and the alliance between psychiatry and the police state.  The marriage of psychiatry with communist/socialist and police state regimes has spanned countries across the globe as an effective means to deal with political dissension.  These practices are not limited to Russia, China, Cuba or Uzbekistan, all of which have recently employed similar psychiatric incarceration of citizens for political protest.  In the UK, a specialized unit called the Fixated Threat Assessment Centre has been granted the authority to incarcerate anyone who has given "inappropriate or threatening communications" to a member of government into a psychiatric ward.  The assessment teams are made up of police, psychiatrists and psychologists who have been given the authority to evaluate, accuse and detain anyone against threat into a mental facility — indefinitely.

If you think this couldn't happen in the U.S., think again.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

New Video/Blog "No More ADHD" featuring Dr. Mary Ann Block

\ 
 

New Video & Blog "No More ADHD"

More than 4 million children in the U.S. alone have been labeled with ADHD and put on drugs documented by the FDA to cause tics, stunted growth, heart attack, stroke and sudden death.  The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies Ritalin, Concerta and other ADHD drugs in the same class of highly addictive drugs as cocaine, morphine and opium.

Psychiatric drugging of kids is big business.  ADHD drugs sales alone generate $3.1 billion a year.  Parents need to be informed that not only is the diagnoses of ADHD completely subjective (a child fidgets, stares out the window, forgets his homework and he can be diagnosed ADHD) but that there are non-drug solutions for solving children's problems of behavior, attention and learning.  Parents have a right to this information.

Dr. Mary Ann Block, Medical Director & Founder of the Block Center, and author of No More ADHD is our featured blog/video interview this week: click here.

   

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Part V - Mothers Act Disease Mongering Campaign

 


Part V, the final installment of the series, "The Mothers Act Disease Mongering Campaign," along with links to the first four parts.
 
In the title of a paper in the May, 2009, Journal of Affective Disorders, Stephen Matthey, of the University of Sydney Infant, Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service Research Unit in Australia, asks, "Are we overpathologising motherhood?" 
 

Friday, September 11, 2009

Former president of the Florida Psychiatric Society arrested

Psychiatrist James Roy Edgar is a former president of the Florida Psychiatric Society

 

 Story and comments here: http://tinyurl.com/kw83m2 

 

 

 

St. Petersburg Times

South Tampa psychiatrist arrested, accused of pointing shotgun at pool cleaner

By Robbyn Mitchell

September 11, 2009

TAMPA — A South Tampa psychiatrist told police he was only trying to get a pool service man off his property when he went to the trunk of his car and pulled out a shotgun in June, say police reports.

Dr. James Roy Edgar, 64, was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon Thursday after the State Attorney's Office issued a warrant.

Here's what the two men involved told police happened, according to the investigating officer's report:

Edgar told police he confronted Stephen Lafoe, 35, an employee of Bay Area Pool Service, outside his home at 3105 W San Isidro St., on June 9 because he had repeatedly asked pool cleaners not to park in his private driveway.

Lafoe said a work order for a customer in the neighborhood directed him to reach the pool through the rear entrance on an alley. He said he made two passes along the alley looking for the gate, but couldn't find it. Then he stopped to make some notes and plug in his next stop on his GPS.

That's when Edgar came out of his house.

Lafoe said he ignored the doctor as he yelled the first time, but then Edgar went into the garage and came back with a shotgun. The doctor said, "I told you to move," as he pointed the gun at him, Lafoe told police.

The pool cleaner said he exchanged words with Edgar and the left the property. As he drove away, Lafoe called his boss, who told him to call police.

After meeting with Lafoe at a gas station on S Dale Mabry Highway and Oklahoma Street, Officer Marcelino Garcia interviewed Edgar.

Garcia said Edgar confirmed a confrontation but disputed the pool cleaner's account about when he brought the gun out and what he did with it.

Edgar said the pool cleaner had stopped in the private drive for his townhouse complex, and that pool cleaners have been using it to service pools in the complex behind his. When Lafoe came back a second time and stopped, he went out to complain.

Edgar said he got the gun after Lafoe "mouthed off" at him, and never pointed it at the pool cleaner.

Edgar said that he was raised around guns and would never point one at someone unless it was self-defense.

"Dr. Edgar carried it in port-arm position and then told the pool cleaner to leave," the officer wrote. "He never pointed it at the pool cleaner and only brought it out because he was afraid of the much younger pool cleaner."

Edgar was arrested Thursday on charges of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. He was released from the Orient Road jail on $2,000 bail.

Contacted at his home by a Times reporter, he declined to comment.

TAMPA PSYCHIATRIST ARRESTED


 
 
NEWS UPDATE ON FLORIDA PSYCHIATRISTS (Two stories below)
 
Psychiatrist Arrested
 
Full story and comments here
St. Petersburg Times
South Tampa psychiatrist arrested, accused of pointing shotgun at pool cleaner
By Robbyn Mitchell
September 11, 2009
 
TAMPA - A South Tampa psychiatrist told police he was only trying to get a pool service man off his property when he went to the trunk of his car and pulled out a shotgun in June, say police reports.
 

Dr. James Roy Edgar, 64, was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon Thursday after the State Attorney's Office issued a warrant.
 

Here's what the two men involved told police happened, according to the investigating officer's report:
 

Edgar told police he confronted Stephen Lafoe, 35, an employee of Bay Area Pool Service, outside his home at 3105 W San Isidro St., on June 9 because he had repeatedly asked pool cleaners not to park in his private driveway....

Edgar was arrested Thursday on charges of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. He was released from the Orient Road jail on $2,000 bail. Contacted at his home by a Times reporter, he declined to comment.
 

Health News Florida
Psychologist settles sex complaint

9/1/2009

St. Petersburg psychologist Ronald Droz, accused of conducting a long-term sexual relationship with one of his patients, has been placed on probation by the Florida Board of Psychology.

The patient, described in the Department of Health's administrative complaint only by her initials LK, had gone to Droz initially in July 1998 with her husband seeking marriage counseling. After two sessions, the complaint says, the husband stopped going, but LK continued until October 1999...

It is a violation of state law for a medical doctor, psychologist or other health professional who is in a position of authority over a patient to engage in sexual conduct.

The settlement, negotiated by DOH prosecutors and Droz's attorney Peter Meros, calls for a reprimand, one year probation, payment of a $4,000 fine and $7,100 in costs, and continuing education courses. Psychologist Vincent Slonim has agreed to serve as Droz's supervisor during probation, according to the final order.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

New Video/Blog-The CIA Mind Control Doctors: From Harvard to Guantanamo


 

The CIA Mind Control Doctors:
From Harvard to Guantanamo

"My book, The C.I.A. Doctors, is based on 15,000 pages of documents I received from the CIA through the Freedom of Information Act and dozens of papers published in medical journals. These papers report the results of research funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Department of the Army, the Office of Naval Research and the CIA."

To read the rest of this blog article, click here

 

Monday, September 07, 2009

Video & Blog with Psycho/Pharma whisteblower Allen Jones

Get the facts about "Depression Testing" of kids from a real Insider
—renowned whistleblower, Allen Jones

Allen Jones gained international attention and press coverage as a whistleblower after he uncovered pharmaceutical industry payments to government officials for the purpose of implementing a national mental health screening/psychotropic drug treatment plan. In this video interview and blog (two separate pieces), Allen describes the pharma funding and psycho/pharma agenda behind mental health "screening" of schoolchildren.

To read the rest of this blog article, click here

Link to Psychiatric Drug Side Effects Search Engine

Tuesday, September 01, 2009

Videos: Get the Facts on Antidepressants and the Alternatives

 

 

Get the facts on Antidepressants and the alternatives!

 

Dr. Timothy Scott, Author of the book, "America Fooled"

 

Dr. Timothy Scott

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doping up our children-Orlando Sentinel

 

Stories on Gabriel Myers are being compiled here: www.gabrielmyers.wordpress.com

 

Sheldon 

Orlando Sentinel

Editorial

Doping up our children

August 31, 2009

 

The state's Department of Children and Families is under fire again, and rightly so.

Recently, a task force issued its final report documenting how weak oversight and lax compliance with guidelines fostered a culture where officials often blindly doled out powerful drugs as chemical pacifiers to help caregivers manage difficult children.

These troubling concerns aren't new to DCF. But in the wake of the withering report, DCF Secretary George Sheldon concedes lapses and vows to heed and fund task-force proposals.

Such accountability is encouraging. But we expected reform before. In 2003, the Statewide Advocacy Council report made similar findings, and concluded, "...unnecessary dispensing of psychotropic medication remains a threat to [foster children]. Until there is more information regarding the safety and efficiency of these drugs, Florida's foster care children should be monitored closely."

That report's proposals were largely ignored. Now, six years later, only swift reforms and a strong mandate to comply with existing rules that govern psychotropic drugs will shelve suspicions that this is déjà vu all over again.

Gabriel Myers becomes the latest Florida foster child whose tragic end led to familiar calls for DCF reform. The boy was removed from his drug-addled mother and turned over to state custody on June 29, 2008. Gabriel hopscotched between a relative and a foster home over the next 10 months. While in state care, he received several psychotropic drugs without valid parental or court consent, as state law requires. One of the drugs, Symbyax, an adult antidepressant, can lead to suicidal thoughts or actions.

On April 16, Gabriel put a shower cord around his neck in the bathroom of his Margate foster home.


Shortly afterward, Mr. Sheldon convened the Gabriel Myers Work Group to investigate the tragedy. The group's 26-page report outlined 148 systemic breakdowns in Gabriel's death.

It notes the egregious disregard of safeguards for foster children that are well "articulated in statute, administrative rule, and operating procedures." Breakdowns in communication, advocacy, supervision, monitoring and oversight only exacerbated matters.

Gabriel was repeatedly evaluated while in care, and often saw therapists, including one who noted, "It is clear that this child is overwhelmed with change and possibly re-experiencing trauma." Somehow, though, caregivers missed the red flags.

And the report backs child advocates who long have insisted the state overmedicates kids: "Psychotropic medications are at times being used to help parents, teachers, and other caregivers calm and manage, rather than treat, children."

In Florida, 15.2 percent of foster kids take at least one psychotropic drug, compared with a 5 percent rate among the general population.

DCF must junk the "fix-it with pharmaceuticals" mentality that, for the sake of expediency, often skirts safer avenues for taming disorderly behavior. Adopting the task force's call for "a higher requirement for due diligence prior to seeking approval for administering these drugs" would be a step forward.

The task force outlines a raft of reforms that include beefing up therapeutic services, adding court-appointed guardians, and bringing on a medical director to direct the use of psychotropic drugs.

Mr. Sheldon says he'll free up resources within DCF to act on the suggestions. And despite austere budgets, he vows to cajole the Legislature to fund such options as behavioral therapy as an alternative to drug therapy. But a will to change must follow words.

Mr. Sheldon told the Fort Myers News-Press that in the past, "Regrettably, I'm afraid people said, 'We dodged a bullet' and it [reforms] never got out into the field. That cannot be the case this time."

It better not. Or DCF almost assuredly in the months to come will experience another tragic case of déjà vu.