Friday, June 08, 2007

Every state should have this law

The New York Times recently ran articles based on public records in Minnesota.   The law in Minnesota requires reporting of money given to doctors by drug companies.

Here are the stories:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/10/health/10psyche.html?ex=1181448000&en=c9fca18cd43aba9e&ei=5070

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/03/health/03docs.html

Here are the applicable Minnesota statutes: 
 
http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/bin/getpub.php?pubtype=STAT_CHAP_SEC&year=current§ion=151.47
151.47 WHOLESALE DRUG DISTRIBUTOR LICENSING REQUIREMENTS.
(f) A wholesale drug distributor shall file with the board an annual report, in a form and on the date prescribed by the board, identifying all payments, honoraria, reimbursement or other compensation authorized under section 151.461, clauses (3) to (5), paid to practitioners in Minnesota during the preceding calendar year. The report shall identify the nature and value of any payments totaling $100 or more, to a particular practitioner during the year, and shall identify the practitioner. Reports filed under this provision are public data.

http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/bin/getpub.php?pubtype=STAT_CHAP_SEC&year=current§ion=151.461
151.461 GIFTS TO PRACTITIONERS PROHIBITED.
It is unlawful for any manufacturer or wholesale drug distributor, or any agent thereof, to offer or give any gift of value to a practitioner. A medical device manufacturer that distributes drugs as
an incidental part of its device business shall not be considered a manufacturer, a wholesale drug distributor, or agent under this section. As used in this section, "gift" does not include:
(1) professional samples of a drug provided to a prescriber for free distribution to patients;
(2) items with a total combined retail value, in any calendar year, of not more than $50;
(3) a payment to the sponsor of a medical conference, professional meeting, or other  educational program, provided the payment is not made directly to a practitioner and is used
solely for bona fide educational purposes;
(4) reasonable honoraria and payment of the reasonable expenses of a practitioner who  serves on the faculty at a professional or educational conference or meeting;
(5) compensation for the substantial professional or consulting services of a practitioner in connection with a genuine research project;
(6) publications and educational materials; or
(7) salaries or other benefits paid to employees.
History: 1993 c 345 art 5 s 11

Minnesota requires reporting promotional expenditures directed at physicians; Maine and Vermont have new reporting systems scheduled to go into force this year, and over 20 other states have legislation moving forward.
 
there are also disclosure laws in Vermont, California, the District of Columbia, Maine and West Virginia and similar legislation was proposed last year in 11 other states.
 

 

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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Why can't we have laws like this for the politicians and government employees?